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CDC Expands Eligibility for COVID-19 Booster Shots

October 25, 2021

On October 21, 2021, CDC Director Rochelle P. Walensky, M.D., M.P.H., endorsed the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ (ACIP) recommendation for a booster shot of COVID-19 vaccine in certain populations. The FDA’s authorization and CDC’s recommendation for use are important steps forward as we work to stay ahead of the virus and keep Americans safe.

For individuals who received a Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, the following groups are eligible for a booster shot at 6 months or more after their initial series:

  • 65 years and older
  • Age 18+ who live in long-term care settings
  • Age 18+ who have underlying medical conditions
  • Age 18+ who work or live in high-risk settings

For the nearly 15 million people who got the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, booster shots are also recommended for those who are 18 and older and who were vaccinated two or more months ago.

There are now booster recommendations for all three available COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. Eligible individuals may choose which vaccine they receive as a booster dose. Some people may have a preference for the vaccine type that they originally received, and others may prefer to get a different booster. CDC’s recommendations now allow for this type of mix and match dosing for booster shots.

Millions of people are newly eligible to receive a booster shot and will benefit from additional protection. However, today’s action should not distract from the critical work of ensuring that unvaccinated people take the first step and get an initial COVID-19 vaccine. More than 65 million Americans remain unvaccinated, leaving themselves- and their children, families, loved ones, and communities- vulnerable.

Available data right now show that all three of the COVID-19 vaccines approved or authorized in the US continue to be highly effective in reducing risk of severe disease, hospitalization, and death, even against the widely circulating Delta variant. Vaccination remains the best way to protect yourself and reduce the spread of the virus and help prevent new variants from emerging.

The following is attributable to Dr. Walensky:

“These recommendations are another example of our fundamental commitment to protect as many people as possible from COVID-19. The evidence shows that all three COVID-19 vaccines authorized in the United States are safe- as demonstrated by the over 400 million vaccine doses already given. And they are all highly effective in reducing the risk of severe disease, hospitalization, and death, even in the midst of the widely circulating Delta variant.”

To learn more, visit https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2021/p1021-covid-booster.html

Who is Eligible for a COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot?

October 18, 2021

What You Need To Know

COVID-19 Vaccine booster shots are available for the following Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine recipients who completed their initial series at least 6 months ago are:

  • 65 years and older
  • Age 18+ who live in long-term care settings
  • Age 18+ who have underlying medical conditions
  • Age 18+ who work in high-risk settings
  • Age 18+ who live in high-risk settings

Data Supporting Need For A Booster Shot

Studies show that after getting vaccinated against COVID-19, protection against the virus may decrease over time and be less able to protect against the Delta variant. Although COVID-19 vaccination for adults aged 65 years and older remains effective in preventing severe disease, recent data suggests vaccination is less effective at preventing infection or milder illness with symptoms. Emerging evidence also shows that among healthcare and other frontline workers, vaccine effectiveness against COVID-19 infection is decreasing over time. This lower effectiveness is likely due to the combination of decreasing protection as time passes since getting vaccinated (e.g., waning immunity) as well as the greater infectiousness of the Delta variant.

Data from a small clinical trial shows that a Pfizer-BioNTech booster shot increased the immune response in trial participants who finished their primary series 6 months earlier. With an increased immune response, people should have improved protection against COVID-19, including the Delta variant.

Booster Shots Are Only Available For Some Pfizer-BioNTech Vaccine Recipients

Only certain populations initially vaccinated with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine can get a booster shot at this time.

Older Adults & 50-64 Year Old People With Medical Conditions

People aged 65 years and older and adults 50-64 with underlying medical conditions should get a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. The risk of severe illness from COVID-19 increases with age, and can also increase for adults of any age with underlying medical conditions.

Long-Term Care Setting Residents Aged 18 Years & Older

Residents aged 18 years and older of long-term care settings should get a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Because residents in long-term care settings live closely together in group settings and are often older adults with underlying medical conditions, they are at increased risk of infection and severe illness from COVID-19.

People With Medical Conditions Aged 18-49 Years

People aged 18-49 years with underlying medical conditions may get a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine based on their individual benefits and risks. Adults aged 18-49 years who have underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. However, that risk is likely not as high as it would be for adults aged 50 years and older who have underlying medical conditions. People aged 18-49 years who have underlying medical conditions may get a booster shot after considering their individual risks and benefits. This recommendation may change in the future as more data becomes available.

Employees And Residents At Increased Risk For COVID-19 Exposure & Transition

People aged 18-64 years at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional setting may get a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine based on their individual benefits and risks. Adults aged 18-64 years who work or reside in certain settings (e.g., healthcare, schools, correctional facilities, homeless shelters) may be at increased risk of being exposed to COVID-19, which could be spreading where they work or reside. Since that risk can vary across settings and based on how much COVID-19 is spreading in a community, people aged 18-64 years who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional setting may get a booster shot after considering their individual risks and benefits. This recommendation may change in the future as more data becomes available.

  • Example of workers who may get the Pfizer-BioNTech booster shots
    • First responders (e.g., healthcare workers, firefighters, police, congregate care staff)
    • Education staff (e.g., teachers, support staff, daycare workers)
    • Food and agriculture workers
    • Manufacturing workers
    • Corrections workers
    • US Postal Service workers
    • Public transit workers
    • Grocery store workers

Find A COVID-19 Vaccine

Find a COVID-19 Vaccine: Search vaccines.gov, text your ZIP code to 438829, or call 1-800-232-0233 to find locations near you.

  • Check your local pharmacy’s website to see if vaccination walk-ins or appointments are available
  • Contact your state or local health department for more information

Frequently Asked Questions

  • When can I get a COVID-19 vaccine booster if I am NOT in one of the recommended groups?
    • Additional populations may be recommended to receive a booster shot as more data becomes available. The COVID-19 vaccines approved and authorized in the United States continue to be effective at reducing risk of severe disease, hospitalization, and death. Experts are looking at all available data to understand how well the vaccines are working for different populations. This includes looking at how new variants, like Delta, affect vaccine effectiveness.
  • What should people do who received Moderna or Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine do?
    • The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) & CDC’s recommendations are bound by what the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) authorization allows. At this time, the Pfizer-BioNTech booster authorization only applies to people whose primary series was Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. People in the recommended groups who got the Moderna or J&J/Janssen vaccine may need a booster shot. More data on the effectiveness and safety of Moderna and J&J/Janssen booster shots are expected soon. With those data in hand, CDC will keep the public informed with a timely plan for Moderna and J&J/Janssen booster shots.
  • If we need a booster shot, does that mean that the vaccines aren’t working?
    • No. COVID-19 vaccines are working well to prevent severe illness, hospitalization, and death, event against the widely circulating Delta variant. However, public health experts are starting to see reduced protection, especially among certain populations, against mild and moderate disease.
  • What are the risks to getting a booster shot?
    • So far, reactions reported after getting the Pfizer-BioNTech booster shot were similar to that of the 2-shot primary series. Fatigue and pain at the injection site were the most commonly reported side effects, and overall, most side effects were mild to moderate. However, as with the 2-shot primary series, serious side effects are rare, but may occur.
  • Am I still considered “fully vaccinated” if I don’t get a booster shot?
    • Yes. Everyone is still considered fully vaccinated two weeks after their second dose in a 2-shot series, such as the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines, or two weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as the J&J/Janssen vaccine.
  • What is the difference between a booster shot and an additional dose?
    • A booster shot is administered when a person has completed their vaccine series and protection against the virus has decreased over time. Additional doses are administered to people with moderately to severely compromised immune systems. This additional dose of an mRNA-COVID-19 vaccine is intended to improve immunocompromised people’s response to their initial vaccine series.
  • Your CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card & Booster Shots
    • At your first vaccination appointment, you should have received a CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record card that tells you what COVID-19 vaccine you received, the date you received, and where you received it. Bring this vaccination card to your booster shot vaccination appointment. If you did not receive a CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record card at your first appointment, contact the vaccination sit where you got your first shot or your state health departments to find out how you can get a card.

To learn more, visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/booster-shot.html#long-term-care

How Long-Term Care Facilities Can Help Monitor COVID-19 Vaccine Safety

October 8, 2021

What Long-Term Care Facility Administrators Should Know

Staff and residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities are among the first groups to receive COVID-19 vaccines in the United States. As an administrator, your and your staff’s participation in vaccine safety monitoring is essential to ensuring the safety of COVID-19 vaccines. No safety concerns have been detected to date, but ongoing monitoring will continue. The CDC has expanded safety surveillance through new systems and additional information sources, as well as by scaling up existing safety monitoring systems.

What is V-Safe?

V-safe is a new smartphone-based tool that helps CDC monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines through the use of text messaging and web surveys. These health check-ins inform CDC how the participant is feeling after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine. Depending on the answers, someone from CDC may call to check on the participant and get more information. V-safe will also remind the participant to get a second dose of the vaccine if they need one. V-safe enrollment and check-ins are quick and easy and can be done on a smartphone. V-safe cannot schedule vaccination appointments. If a participant needs to schedule, reschedule, or cancel a COVID-19 vaccination appointment, they should contact either the location that set up their appointment or local vaccination provider.

  • All long-term care staff members who are vaccinated against COVID-19 are encouraged to enroll in V-safe.
  • Long-term care residents can also enroll in V-safe. Healthcare providers and caregivers may assist residents with enrolling. However, providers or caregivers should not complete check-ins for residents.
  • At this time, only people with smartphones will be able to participate in V-safe monitoring. Long-term care residents may be less likely to have access to a smartphone and, therefore, may not be able to report side effects or adverse events through V-safe. Long-term care staff should monitor recently vaccinated residents for any potential adverse events and report those events to VAERS.

What is VAERS?

VAERS is a national vaccine safety monitoring system that helps CDC and the FDA monitor health problems after vaccination. VAERS is not designed to determine if a vaccine a health problem but is especially useful for detecting unusual or unexpected patterns of adverse event reporting that might indicate a possible safety problem with a vaccine. Residents, caregivers, healthcare providers, and nursing home staff can report medical events or health problems following vaccinations to VAERS, even if they aren’t sure the vaccine was the cause.

  • Anyone can report health problems that happen after vaccination to VAERS.
  • In general, report any medical event or health problem after COVID-19 vaccination that is concerning to you, your staff, or your residents.
  • It is especially important to report any problem that results in hospitalization, significant disability, or death.
  • VAERS does NOT provide treatment or medical advice. If a vaccine recipient needs medical advice, please contact a healthcare provider.

Healthcare providers are encouraged to report to VAERS any adverse event they think is medically important or clinically significant, even if they think the event might not be related to the vaccine. However, healthcare providers are required to report to VAERS the following adverse events, in accordance with the emergency use authorization (EUA) for COVID-19 vaccines:

  • Vaccine administration errors, whether or not associated with an adverse event
  • Serious adverse events (as defined by federal law), regardless of causality, including:
    • Death
    • A life-threatening event
    • Inpatient hospitalization or prolongation of existing hospitalization
    • Persistent or significant incapacity or substantial disruption of the ability to conduct normal life functions
    • Congenital anomaly/birth defect
    • An important medical event that based on appropriate medical judgement may jeopardize the individual and may require medical or surgical intervention to prevent one of the outcomes listed above
    • Cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS-C or MIS-A)
    • Cases of COVID-19 that result in hospitalization or death

To learn more, visit https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/downloads/ltcf-help-monitor-covid-19-vaccine-safety-508.pdf

Success Story: Wilma Penix

October 5, 2021

Boyd Nursing & Rehabilitation is proud to recognize Wilma Penix’s Success Story.

Wilma came to Boyd Nursing at the end of September for a short rehab stay to regain her strength and independence. After a hospital stay for the progression of her kidney disease and coronary artery disease, Mrs. Penix was unable to care for herself safely at home. She demonstrated strength deficits and balance concerns, leading to an increased risk of falls. During her stay, she worked hard in physical and occupational therapy and was always smiling and laughing throughout her treatments.

Mrs. Wilma was able to regain her strength and her ability to ambulate more than 200ft using her case. She was ecstatic to be able to discharge home, with the help of her son! Congratulations, Mrs. Wilma, we are so excited to have been part of your success!

COVID-19 County Check Tool: Understanding Community Transmission Levels in Your County

October 4, 2021

COVID-19 spreads easily between people. CDC tracks how much COVID-19 is spreading as well as likely people are to be exposed to it with a measurement known as the “level of community transmission”. You can use the COVID-19 County Check Tool for a snapshot of your county’s level of community transmission over the past 7 days. The tool also displays guidance on masking based on how the virus is spreading in your county.

How CDC Measures the County Level of Community Transmission

CDC looks at two numbers – total new cases and percent positivity – to determine the level of community transmission.

  • Total New Cases refers to a county’s rate of new COVID-19 infections, reported over the past 7 days, per every 100,000 residents. To calculate this number, CDC divides the total number of new infections by the total population in that county. CDC multiplies this number by 100,000.
  • Percent Positivity refers to the percentage of positive COVID-19 tests in a county over the past 7 days. This number is based on reports from states on a specific type of test known as a Nucleic Acid Amplification Test (NAAT). To calculate this number, CDC divides the number of positive tests by the total number of NAATs performed in that county. CDC multiplies this number by 100 to calculate the percentage of all tests that were positive. Learn more at Calculating SARS-CoV-2 Laboratory Test Percent Positivity.

A higher number of total new cases and a higher percent positivity correspond with a higher level of community transmission, as shown below. If the values for each of these two metric differ (for example, if one indicated moderate and the other low), then the higher of the two should be used to make decisions about mask use in a county.

County Level of Community Transmission and Masking

People and local decision-makers should consider the county level of community transmission when making decisions about masking. Although COVID-19 vaccines authorized in the United States are highly effective at limiting the spread of COVID-19 and preventing severe illness, vaccination in some parts of the country remains low. Layered prevention strategies – like masking along with getting vaccinated – can help further reduce the spread of COVID-19. CDC’s updated guidance, issued in July 2021, advises using county community transmission levels over the last 7 days to help determine who should mask and under what circumstances. See below for a quick reference on when to mask:

County Level of Community TransmissionGuidance
High or Substantial TransmissionEveryone should wear a mask in public, indoor settings
Moderate or Low TransmissionUnvaccinated people should wear a mask in public, indoor settings

Mask requirements vary from place to place. Make sure you follow local laws, rules, regulation, or guidance. To learn more, visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/more/aboutcovidcountycheck/index.html

Success Story: Jennie Royster

September 29, 2021

Boyd Nursing & Rehabilitation is proud to recognize Jennie Royster’s Success Story.

Mrs. Jennie Royster was admitted in July after being in the hospital for a right shoulder fracture she sustained from a fall. She was unable to return home from the hospital, as she demonstrated deficits in balance and strength, leading to an inability to care for herself safely. Mrs. Royster participated in all three therapy disciplines: physical, occupational, and speech therapies. While in the therapy gym, she worked hard, always trying to do just a little more than what was asked of her. She often encouraged her new friends during their exercises.

Due to her dedication and strong willingness throughout her treatment sessions, Mrs. Jennie made great improvements in all aspects of her mobility! She was able to ambulate over 250ft using her rollator and perform her daily self-care at a supervised level. We were thrilled that, with the support of her daughters, Mrs. Royster was able to return home! Congratulations, Mrs. Jennie, we are so happy to have been part of your success!

Comparative Effectiveness of Moderna, Pfizer, and Janssen Vaccines in Preventing COVID-19 Hospitalizations

September 27, 2021

What We Know

Two 2-dose mRNA COVID-19 vaccines (from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna) and a 1-dose viral vector vaccine (from Janssen [Johnson & Johnson]) are currently used in the United states.

What is New

Among US adults without immunocompromising conditions, vaccine effectiveness against COVID-19 hospitalization during March 11-August 15, 2021, was higher for the Moderna vaccine (93%) than the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine (88%) and the Janssen vaccine (71%).

Implications for Public Health Practice

Although these real-world data suggest some variation in levels of protection by vaccine, all FDA-approved or authorized COVID-19 vaccines provide substantial protection against COVID-19 hospitalization.

Two-dose regiments of the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA vaccines provided a high level of protection against COVID-19 hospitalizations in a real-world evaluation at 21 hospitals during March-August 2021. VE against COVID-19 hospitalization for Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines was 93% and 88%, respectively, whereas the single-dose Janssen vaccine had someone lower VE at 71%. Persons vaccinated with Janssen also had lower postvaccination anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels than did recipients of mRNA vaccines. Although an immunologic correlate or protection has not been established for COVID-19 vaccines, antibody titers after infection and vaccination have been associated with protection (8). These real-world data suggests that the 2-dose Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA vaccine regimens provide more protection than does the 1-dose Janssen viral vector vaccine regimen. Although the Janssen vaccine had lower observed VE, 1 dose of Janssen vaccine still reduced risk for COVID-19-associated hospitalization by 71%.

The findings in this report are subject to at least six limitations. First, this analysis did not consider children, immunocompromised adults, or VE against COVID-19 that did not result in hospitalization. Second, the Cis for the Janssen VE estimates were wide because of the relatively small number of patients who received this vaccine. Third, follow-up time was limited to approximately 29 weeks since receipt of full vaccination, and further surveillance of VE over time is warranted. Fourth, although VE estimates were adjusted for relevant potential confounders, residual confounding is possible. Fifth, product-specific VE by variant, including against Delta variants (B.1.617.2 and AY sublineages), was not evaluated. Finally, antibody levels were measured at only a single time point 2-6 weeks after vaccination and changes in antibody response over time as well as cell-mediated immune responses were not assessed.

To learn more, visit https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7038e1.htm?s_cid=mm7038e1_x

I’ve Already Had COVID-19. Do I Need the Vaccine?

September 17, 2021

You should get a COVID-19 vaccine, even if you have already had COVID-19. Research has not yet shown how long you are protected from getting COVID-19 again after you recover from COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccinations also help protect you even if you’ve already had the virus


Evidence is emerging that people get better protection by being fully vaccinated compared with having COVID-19. One study showed that unvaccinated people who already had COVID-19 are more than two times as likely than fully vaccinated people to get COVID-19 again. Learn more about why getting vaccinated is a safer way to build protection than getting infected.
If you were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, you should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Talk to your healthcare professional if you are unsure what treatments you received or if you have more questions about getting a COVID-19 vaccine.


Experts are still learning more about how long vaccines protect against COVID-19 in real-world conditions. CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.
To learn more, visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/prepare-for-vaccination.html

Success Story: Mark Oney

August 27, 2021

Boyd Nursing and Rehabilitation would like to recognize Mr. Mark Oney as our most recent patient Success Story.

Mark was admitted in May 2021 after being in the hospital for LE cellulitis. He presented to us with a compromised health status, as he demonstrated deficits in balance and strength, which lead to a need for increased assistance with mobility and self care. Mr. Oney has become an eager therapy participant in both physical and occupational therapy during his stay. He has shown great improvement in all aspects of his mobility, even winning gold in many events during our “Rehab Olympics”! Mark is now able to walk about the facility unassisted and often visits many of his friends here throughout the day.

We are thrilled to have been part of such an amazing rehabilitation story and are so proud of Mark for all that he has been able to accomplish!

Find COVID-19 Vaccine Near You

July 22, 2021

Search vaccines.gov, text your ZIP code to 438829, or call 1-800-232-0233 to find locations near you in the U.S. 

There are several ways you can look for vaccination providers near you in the United States. 

  • Visit Vaccines.gov to find vaccination providers near you. In some states, information may be limited while more U. S. vaccination providers and pharmacies are being added. Learn more about COVID-19 Vaccination Locations on Vaccines.gov
  • Text your ZIP code to 438829 or call 1-800-232-0233 to find vaccine locations near you in the United States. 
  • Check your local pharmacy’s website to see if vaccination appointments are available. Find out which pharmacies are participating in the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program
  • Contact your state health department to find additional vaccination locations in the area. 
  • Check your local news outlets. They may have information on how to get a vaccination appointment. 

Success Story: Mary Pinkerton

July 22, 2021

Boyd Nursing and Rehabilitation would like to personally recognize Mrs. Mary Pinkerton as our most recent patient success story!

Mrs. Pinkerton was admitted to Boyd Nursing for rehab in May 2021 after sustaining a R humerus fracture. Mary presented to us with a compromised health status, as she was experiencing significant balance and mobility deficits, decreased strength, and was requiring extensive assistance with completing selfcare activities. 

Mrs. Pinkerton actively engaged in physical and occupational therapy services to learn compensatory strategies to regain her mobility and ability to perform activities of daily living in order to return to community living.  After 4 weeks of rehab and continual nursing services, Mary improved her ability to walk over 100 feet with an adaptive device and to perform her selfcare with CGA! With the support of her loving family, Mary was able to return home. Congratulations Mrs. Pinkerton, we are very proud of your progress and happy to have assisted you along the way!

COVID-19 Viral Testing Tool

July 16, 2021

The COVID-19 Viral Testing Tool is an interactive web tool designed to help both healthcare providers and individuals understand COVID-19 testing options. This tool helps healthcare providers quickly access the most relevant, actionable information to determine what type(s) of COVID-19 testing they should recommend to patients. The tool helps individuals determine what type of test they should seek. After test results are in, the tool can help interpret test results and guide next steps.  

The online, mobile-friendly tool asks a series of questions, and provides recommended actions and resources based on the user’s responses. 

To use the COVID-19 Viral Testing Tool, click here: Testing | CDC

Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines

July 9, 2021

Now that there are authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, accurate vaccine information is critical and can help stop common myths and rumors. Read about some common myths here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/facts.html 

How do I know which COVID-19 vaccine information are accurate? 

It can be difficult to know which sources of information you can trust. Before considering vaccine information on the Internet, check that the information comes from a credible source and is updated on a regular basis. Learn more about finding credible vaccine information.  

COVID-19 Travel Planner

July 2, 2021

The COVID-19 Travel Planner is a centralized communication platform that travelers can search to find COVID-19 information for the state, local, territorial, and tribal communities they’re passing through and for their destinations. This information will help travelers make informed decisions, protect themselves, and reduce transmission before, during and after they travel.

Check Travel Planner for state, local, tribal, and territorial government restrictions before traveling. 

How Did COVID-19 Get It’s Name?

June 25, 2021

On February 11, 2020, the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease: coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated COVID-19. ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. The virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, is a coronavirus. The word corona means crown and refers to the appearance that coronaviruses get from the spike proteins sticking out of them.

Success Story: Lymon Wilburn

June 21, 2021

Boyd Nursing and Rehab is pleased to recognize Mr. Lymon Wilburn as our patient success story for this month!

Mr. Wilburn came to Boyd Nursing in a few months ago following a medically complicated hospitalization with multiple cardiac issues. Lymon presented to us with significant weakness, limited mobility, and difficulty performing basic activities of daily living. After the past 2 months of nursing care, skilled therapy services, dietary management, and a strong will to get better, Lymon has made a remarkable recovery!

He has made significant improvements with ambulation using an assisted device and his ability to perform his self-care with supervision assistance. Lymon is looking forward to further progress with therapy services in order to soon return to community living, thanks to the care he has received at Boyd Nursing and Rehab. Congratulations Lymon, we are very happy to have had to opportunity to assist you on this road to recovery. We wish you the very best!

How COVID-19 Spreads

June 18, 2021

COVID-19 spreads when an infected person breathes out droplets and very small particles that contain the virus. These droplets and particles can be breathed in by other people or land on their eyes, noses, or mouth. In some circumstances, they may contaminate surfaces they touch. People who are closer than 6 feet from the infected person are most likely to get infected. 

COVID-19 is spread in three main ways: 

  • Breathing in air when close to an infected person who is exhaling small droplets and particles that contain the virus. 
  • Having these small droplets and particles that contain virus land on the eyes, nose, or mouth, especially through splashes and sprays like a cough or sneeze. 
  • Touching eyes, nose, or mouth with hands that have the virus on them. 

Coronavirus Self-Checker

June 11, 2021

The Coronavirus Self-Checker is an interactive clinical assessment tool that will assist individuals ages 13 and older, and parents and caregivers of children ages 2 to 12 on deciding when to seek testing or medical care if they suspect they or someone they know has contracted COVID-19 or has come into close contact with someone who has COVID-19. 

The online, mobile-friendly tool asks a series of questions, and based on the user’s responses, provides recommended actions and resources. 

To access the Self-Checker, click here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/coronavirus-self-checker.html

Fully Vaccinated? What You Should Keep Doing:

June 4, 2021

For now, if you’ve been fully vaccinated: 

  • You will still need to follow guidance at your workplace and local businesses. 
  • If you travel, you should still take steps to protect yourself and others
  • Masks are required on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations. Travelers are not required to wear a mask in outdoor areas of a conveyance (like on a ferry or the top deck of a bus). CDC recommends that travelers who are not fully vaccinated continue to wear a mask and maintain physical distance when traveling. 
  • Fully vaccinated international travelers arriving in the United States are still required to get tested 3 days before travel by air into the United States (or show documentation of recovery from COVID-19 in the past 3 months) and should still get tested 3-5 days after their trip. 
  • You should still watch out for symptoms of COVID-19, especially if you’ve been around someone who is sick. If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you should get tested and stay home and away from others. 
  • People who have a condition or are taking medications that weaken the immune system, should continue to take all precautions recommended for unvaccinated people until advised otherwise by their healthcare provider. 

I’ve Had COVID-19, Should I Be Vaccinated?

May 28, 2021

Yes, you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19. That’s because experts do not yet know how long you are protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. Even if you have already recovered from COVID-19, it is possible—although rare—that you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 again. Studies have shown that vaccination provides a strong boost in protection in people who have recovered from COVID-19. Learn more about why getting vaccinated is a safer way to build protection than getting infected. 

What We Know About COVID-19 Vaccines

May 21, 2021

Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine will also help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19. Learn more about the benefits of getting vaccinated.

COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. It typically takes 2 weeks after vaccination for the body to build protection (immunity) against the virus that causes COVID-19. That means it is possible a person could still get COVID-19 before or just after vaccination and then get sick because the vaccine did not have enough time to build protection. People are considered fully vaccinated 2 weeks after their second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, or 2 weeks after the single-dose Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. 

How COVID-19 Spreads

May 7, 2021

COVID-19 spreads when an infected person breathes out droplets and very small particles that contain the virus. These droplets and particles can be breathed in by other people or land on their eyes, noses, or mouth. In some circumstances, they may contaminate surfaces they touch. People who are closer than 6 feet from the infected person are most likely to get infected. 

COVID-19 is spread in three main ways: 

  • Breathing in air when close to an infected person who is exhaling small droplets and particles that contain the virus. 
  • Having these small droplets and particles that contain virus land on the eyes, nose, or mouth, especially through splashes and sprays like a cough or sneeze. 
  • Touching eyes, nose, or mouth with hands that have the virus on them. 

Choosing Safer Activities

April 30, 2021
  • If you are fully vaccinated, you can start doing many things that you had stopped doing because of the pandemic. 
  • When choosing safer activities, consider how COVID-19 is spreading in your community, the number of people participating in the activity, and the location of the activity. 
  • Outdoor visits and activities are safer than indoor activities, and fully vaccinated people can participate in some indoor events safely, without much risk. 
  • If you haven’t been vaccinated yet, find a vaccine

Have You Been Fully Vaccinated?

April 23, 2021

In general, people are considered fully vaccinated: ± 

  • 2 weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series, such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or 
  • 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine 

If you don’t meet these requirements, regardless of your age, you are NOT fully vaccinated. Keep taking all precautions until you are fully vaccinated. 

If you have a condition or are taking medications that weaken your immune system, you may NOT be fully protected even if you are fully vaccinated. Talk to your healthcare provider. Even after vaccination, you may need to continue taking all precautions. To learn what ways to protect yourself and others click here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/prevention.html 

How Do I Find a COVID-19 Vaccine?

April 16, 2021

There are several ways you can look for vaccination providers near you. 

  • Visit Vaccines.gov to find vaccination providers near you. In some states, information may be limited while more vaccination providers and pharmacies are being added. Learn more about COVID-19 Vaccination Locations on Vaccines.gov
  • Text your zip code to 438829 or call 1-800-232-0233 to find vaccine locations near you. 
  • Check your local pharmacy’s website to see if vaccination appointments are available. Find out which pharmacies are participating in the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program
  • Contact your state health department to find additional vaccination locations in the area. 
  • Check your local news outlets. They may have information on how to get a vaccination appointment. 

Success Story: Norma Williamson

April 12, 2021

Boyd Nursing and Rehabilitation is excited to share the successful recovery of resident, Mrs. Norma Williamson. 

Mrs. Williamson came to Boyd Nursing for rehabilitation on Christmas Eve following an extensive hospital stay.  This was a difficult transition for her during the holiday season, however Norma proved herself willful to return home.  Upon coming to Boyd, Norma presented with a host of complications and underlying impairments including severe weakness, immobility, swallowing issues, weight loss, and inability to care for herself. 

Over the course of the following 3 months, Norma actively worked with her rehab team of Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapists as well as our skilled nursing and dietary professionals to regain her strength and mobility, improve her nutritional intake and dietary level, and restore her to her prior level of functional independence of requiring very minimal physical assistance from caregivers. 

It was an extra blessing this Easter to see Mrs. Williamson return home to her loving family.

Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines

April 9, 2021

Now that there are authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines in the United States, accurate vaccine information is critical and can help stop common myths and rumors. Read about some common myths here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/facts.html 

How do I know which COVID-19 vaccine information are accurate? 

It can be difficult to know which sources of information you can trust. Before considering vaccine information on the Internet, check that the information comes from a credible source and is updated on a regular basis. Learn more about finding credible vaccine information.  

What are the most common side effects after getting a covid-19 vaccine?

April 2, 2021

After getting vaccinated, you might have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection. Common side effects are pain, redness, and swelling in the arm where you received the shot, as well as tiredness, headache, muscle pain, chills, fever, and nausea throughout the rest of the body. These side effects could affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. Learn more about what to expect after getting a COVID-19 vaccine.  

Care Team Member Spotlight: Whitley Griffith, SSD

March 25, 2021

We are proud to highlight Whitley Griffith, Social Services & Admissions Director at Boyd Nursing & Rehabilitation.  Along with her expertise in social work, Whitley is a versatile team player willing to help Care Team Members and residents with any of their needs.

“My favorite thing about my job is helping the residents, ensuring that they have everything that they need and seeing the smiles on their faces.”

In addition to being an integral part of the admissions process, Whitely completes mood interviews and assists residents with care planning. Each day, she provides residents with personalized and compassionate care. “I visit the residents if they have any concerns throughout the day. I love seeing them happy and helping in any way I can.”

Whitley loves to see residents achieve their goals. For residents receiving therapy, it’s seeing them reach their highest level of functioning. “It’s satisfying when they are able to go home. In our community, they get their rehabilitation services and are able to go home. It is very rewarding!”

Thank you Whitley for your dedication to residents and the care team members!

Success Story: Terry Callihan

March 11, 2021

Boyd Nursing and Rehab is pleased to recognize resident, Mr. Terry Callihan.

Mr. Callihan came to Boyd Nursing in December of 2020 following a following a hospital stay which left him with weakness, limited mobility, and inability to perform basic activities of daily living.

After 2 months of nursing care, multiple therapies, and dietary management, Terry has made a remarkable recovery. He has regained the ability to independently perform self care activities and to be able to perform transfers to and from his w/c.

Terry is looking forward to soon return to home with his family and community living thanks to the care he has received at Boyd Nursing and Rehab.

Congratulations Terry Callihan, we are very happy to have had to opportunity to assist you on this road to recovery.

Care Team Member Spotlight: Cindy Salyers

March 9, 2021

We are proud to highlight Cindy Salyers, Executive Director at Boyd Nursing and Rehabilitation.  Cindy is an outstanding administrator with 42 years of experience in long-term care.

Cindy attended Boyd County High School and cherishes close ties with her community.  “I know the people well, and there’s a lot of people that come in here that their parents are people I went to school with or somebody I may know. So it’s really a home to me.”

As an administrator, she notes it’s important to take the time to give each resident personalized attention. She most enjoys these moments, “When you get to interact with the residents. When you actually get to sit and talk and find out a little bit about their life or what their favorite thing is. Or when you get to talking and you find out you might almost be related, that’s always fun.”

While the pandemic has been a challenging time for everyone in long term care, Cindy is proud of how her dedicated team has adapted and drawn closer.

“We roll with punches. Each day, you have a new regulation or new guidance. We do what we need to do for the safety and the care of our residents and the staff. We want to protect our families, our friends, our residents, and everybody. That’s what these regulations are for. And that’s what you’ve got to remember.”

Cindy says it’s important to lend a helping hand when needed.  “As executive director or a manager, especially of a small facility, you wear many hats. Each of us does our part as a patient care advocate or a patient care assistant. We step in to help take care of the residents when needed.”

Thank you Cindy for your dedication to residents and the care team members who care for them!

COVID-19: V-Safe Tool

March 6, 2021

CDC’s new v-safe tool uses text messages and surveys to check in with you after you get a COVID-19 vaccine. You can quickly tell CDC how you’re feeling and if you have any side effects. Get vaccinated, then:

  • Go to vsafe.cdc.gov
  • Click “Get started”
  • Fill in all requested information
  • Verify your smartphone
  • Add your vaccine information
  • Wait for your first check-in

Learn more about v-safe and how to register: https://bit.ly/3izTu0Z

Success Story: Sara Walker

February 10, 2021

Boyd Nursing and Rehabilitation would like to personally recognize Mrs. Sara Walker as our most recent patient success story. 

Mrs. Walker admitted to Boyd Nursing for rehab in December of 2020 after sustaining a wrist fracture which required surgical repair.  Sara presented to us with a compromised health status as she was experiencing significant balance and mobility deficits, decreased strength, and was requiring extensive assistance with completing self-care activities.  Mrs. Walker, having been a career teacher, took on the role of student as she learned compensatory strategies and adaptive techniques throughout her rehabilitation process, regaining her mobility and ability to perform activities of daily living in order to return to independent living.  After 6 weeks of rehab and nursing care, Sara is now walking over 100 feet with an adaptive device and is able to perform her self-care with CGA. 

With the support of her loving family, Sara is now planning to return home.  Congratulations Mrs. Walker, we are very proud of your progress and happy to have assisted you along the way!

Continue protecting against COVID-19

February 6, 2021

Even as vaccine distribution begin, we each need to do our part of prevent the spread of COVID-19. You should layer steps to help protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

• Wear a mask that covers your mouth AND nose.

• Stay at least 6 feet from people who don’t live with you, and avoid crowds.

• Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or use hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol.

• Get a COVID-19 vaccine when it is your turn.

Help slow the spread of COVID-19. Learn more:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/prevention.html

COVID-19 Vaccine Q & A: Can a COVID-19 vaccine make me sick with COVID-19?

January 30, 2021

No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines or COVID-19 vaccines currently in development in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

There are several different types of vaccines in development. All of them teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity (protection against the virus that causes COVID-19) after vaccination. That means it’s possible a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and still get sick. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.

Learn more at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/facts.html

Success Story: Jimmy Morgan

January 27, 2021

Boyd Nursing and Rehab is pleased to recognize Mr. Jimmy Morgan as our patient success story for this month. Mr. Morgan came to Boyd Nursing in October of 2020 following a medically complicated hospitalization compounded by recent CVA and COVID 19. Jimmy presented to us with significant weakness, limited mobility, and inability to perform basic activities of daily living.

After 3 months of nursing care, multiple therapies, and dietary management, Jimmy has made a remarkable recovery. He has regained the ability to independently ambulate with an assisted device and to be able to perform his own self care. Jimmy is looking forward to soon return to community living thanks to the care he received at Boyd Nursing and Rehab.

Congratulations Jimmy Morgan, we are very happy to have had to opportunity to assist you on this road to recovery.

Is the COVID Vaccine Safe?

January 23, 2021

(Info from the CDC – https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html)

All the COVID-19 vaccines being used have gone through rigorous studies to ensure they are as safe as possible. Systems that allow CDC to watch for safety issues are in place across the entire country.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Emergency Use Authorizations for COVID-19 vaccines that have been shown to meet rigorous safety criteria and be effective as determined by data from the manufacturers and findings from large clinical trials. Watch a video describing the emergency use authorization. Clinical trials for all vaccines must first show they meet rigorous criteria for safety and effectiveness before any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines, can be authorized or approved for use. The known and potential benefits of a COVID-19 vaccine must outweigh the known and potential risks of the vaccine

Benefits of Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine

January 16, 2021

You may be concerned about getting vaccinated now that COVID-19 vaccines are available in the United States. While more COVID-19 vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized or approved for use. Safety is a top priority, and there are many reasons to get vaccinated.

Information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

  • All COVID-19 vaccines currently available in the United States have been shown to be highly effective at preventing COVID-19. Learn more about the different COVID-19 vaccines.
  • All COVID-19 vaccines that are in development are being carefully evaluated in clinical trials and will be authorized or approved only if they make it substantially less likely you’ll get COVID-19. Learn more about how federal partners are ensuring COVID-19 vaccines work.
  • Based on what we know about vaccines for other diseases and early data from clinical trials, experts believe that getting a COVID-19 vaccine may also help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19.
  • Getting vaccinated yourself may also protect people around you, particularly people at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
  • Experts continue to conduct more studies about the effect of COVID-19 vaccination on severity of illness from COVID-19, as well as its ability to keep people from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19.

Learn more at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/vaccine-benefits.html

Doctor Visits and Getting Medicines

January 8, 2021

Talk to your doctor online, by phone, or e-mail.

  • Use telemedicine, if available, or communicate with your doctor or nurse by phone or e-mail.
  • Talk to your doctor about rescheduling procedures that are not urgently needed.

If you must visit in-person, protect yourself and others

  • If you think you have COVID-19, notify the doctor or healthcare provider before your visit and follow their instructions.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask when you have to go out in public.
  • Do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • Stay at least 6 feet away from others while inside and in lines.
  • When paying, use touchless payment methods if possible. If you cannot use touchless payment, sanitize your hands after paying with card, cash, or check. Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds when you get home.

To learn more visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/doctor-visits-medicine.html

COVID-19 Vaccine: What to Expect After

January 2, 2021

COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you from getting COVID-19. You may have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection. These side effects may feel like flu and may even affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days.

For more information, download our flyer:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/pdfs/321466-A_FS_What_Expect_COVID-19_Vax_Final_12.13.20.pdf

When Vaccine is Limited, Who Gets Vaccinated First?

December 26, 2020

Because the supply of COVID-19 vaccine in the United States is expected to be limited at first, CDC is providing recommendations to federal, state, and local governments about who should be vaccinated first. CDC’s recommendations are based on recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), an independent panel of medical and public health experts.

The recommendations were made with these goals in mind:

  • Decrease death and serious disease as much as possible.
  • Preserve functioning of society.
  • Reduce the extra burden COVID-19 is having on people already facing disparities.

Healthcare personnel and residents of long-term care facilities should be offered the first doses of COVID-19 vaccines

CDC recommends that initial supplies of COVID-19 vaccine be allocated to healthcare personnel and long-term care facility residents. This is referred to as Phase 1a. CDC made this recommendation on December 3, 2020.

To learn more visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations.html

Travel and COVID-19

December 18, 2020

Travel can increase your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19. If traveling to visit family or friends, you should be thought of as an overnight guest and take all recommended precautions for 14 days upon arrival:

• Wear a mask that covers both your mouth AND nose.
• Avoid close contact with those you are visiting by staying at least 6 feet apart.
• Avoid contact with anyone who is sick.
• Avoid touching your mask, eyes, nose, and mouth.
• Improve ventilation by opening windows and doors.
• Wash your hands with soap and water or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.


Learn more about Travel and Overnight Guests: https://bit.ly/2LLah4F

Holidays: Attending a Small Celebration

December 11, 2020

Attending a small celebration? Take these steps to make the #Holidays safer:


• Bring your own food, drinks, and utensils.
• #WearAMask and store it in your pocket or purse while eating and drinking.
• Avoid going in and out of food prep spaces.
• Space seating at least 6 feet apart for people who don’t live with you.
• Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or if unavailable, use 60% alcohol hand sanitizer.


More tips: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/holidays/winter.html

Success Story: Mr. Bill Garrett

December 6, 2020

Mr. Bill Garrett was admitted to Boyd Nursing for rehabilitation in August following complications of a L shoulder abscess. Upon admission, Mr. Garrett presented with decreased strength and activity tolerance, limited ROM, immobility, and required extensive assistance with ADLs. Later, Mr. Garrett acquired COVID-19 to further challenge his recovery process.

Given the complexity of his situation, Mr. Garrett required IV medication management, lab monitoring, Physical Therapy, and Occupational Therapy services in order to return to community living.

Despite all the obstacles, this did not damper Mr. Garrett’s will to return home with his family. Mr. Garrett is a Veteran of the U.S. Military. Those same characteristics of faith, courage, will power, and endurance that he encompassed as a soldier prevailed throughout his hospitalizations and rehabilitative stay while at Boyd.

We are pleased to announce that Mr. Garrett has improved in his strength and mobility to be able to perform assisted transfers and participate in his self-care activities. This improvement enables him to be able to return home to his family in time for the Holiday Season!

Congratulations Mr. Garrett! We are happy to have been able to assist you during your recovery.

Success Story: Romona Cumpton

December 6, 2020

Boyd Nursing and Rehabilitation would like to turn the spotlight on Ms. Romona Cumpton. Her story in truly inspiring!

Ms. Romona Cumpton was admitted to Boyd Nursing for rehabilitation on November 6, 2020 following a pelvic fracture. Upon admission to Boyd Nursing and Rehabilitation, Ms. Cumpton was experiencing weakness, balance deficits, and required assistance with mobility and ADL’s. Ms. Cumpton required medication management, lab monitoring, and Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy services.

We are pleased to say that Ms. Cumpton has improved in her strength and mobility to be able to perform self-care activities with little assistance. Ms. Cumpton is also now ambulating up to 175 feet at a given time. This improvement enables her to be able to return home with her family.

Congratulations Ms. Cumpton! We are happy to have been able to assist you during your recovery!

Holiday Gatherings

December 4, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful and isolating for many people. Gatherings during the upcoming holidays can be an opportunity to reconnect with family and friends. This holiday season, consider how your holiday plans can be modified to reduce the spread of COVID-19 to keep your friends, families, and communities healthy and safe.

Holiday celebrations will likely need to be different this year to prevent the spread.

Who should NOT attend a holiday gathering:

Do not host or participate in any in-person gatherings if you or anyone in your household:

• Has been diagnosed with COVID-19 and has not met the criteria for when it is safe to be around others
• Has symptoms of COVID-19
• Is waiting for COVID-19 viral test results
• May have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 in the last 14 days
• Is at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19
Do not host or attend gatherings with anyone who has COVID-19 or has been exposed to someone with COVID-19 in the last 14 days.

Learn more at
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/holidays.html#holiday-celebrations

When to Quarantine

November 27, 2020

Quarantine is used to keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. Quarantine helps prevent spread of disease that can occur before a person knows they are sick or if they are infected with the virus without feeling symptoms.

People in quarantine should stay home, separate themselves from others, monitor their health, and follow directions from their state or local health department.

When to Quarantine?

People who have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19—excluding people who have had COVID-19 within the past 3 months.


People who have tested positive for COVID-19 do not need to quarantine or get tested again for up to 3 months as long as they do not develop symptoms again.

People who develop symptoms again within 3 months of their first bout of COVID-19 may need to be tested again if there is no other cause identified for their symptoms.


What counts as close contact?


• You were within 6 feet of someone who has COVID-19 for a total of 15 minutes or more
• You provided care at home to someone who is sick with COVID-19
• You had direct physical contact with the person (hugged or kissed them)
• You shared eating or drinking utensils
• They sneezed, coughed, or somehow got respiratory droplets on you

For more information, visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus

Celebrating Thanksgiving

November 20, 2020

This Thanksgiving, staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19. Also consider these tips:


• Avoid crowds. Shop online sales the day after Thanksgiving and the days leading up to winter holidays.


• Use contactless delivery or curbside pick-up for purchased items.


• Shop in open-air markets and stay 6 feet away from others.


More tips:
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/holidays/thanksgiving.html

How to Properly Wear a Mask

November 13, 2020

COVID-19 spreads mainly from person to person through respiratory droplets. Respiratory droplets travel into the air when you cough, sneeze, talk, shout, or sing. These droplets can then land in the mouths or noses of people who are near you or they may breathe these droplets in.

Masks are a simple barrier to help prevent your respiratory droplets from reaching others. Studies show that masks reduce the spray of droplets when worn over the nose and mouth.

Your mask should:


✔️ Reach above the nose, below the chin, and completely cover the mouth and nostrils
✔️ Fit snugly against the sides of the face
✔️ Be made of multiple layers of fabric that you can still breathe through
✔️ Be able to be laundered and machine dried without damaging the material or shape


Do not buy surgical masks to use as a mask. Those are intended for healthcare workers and first responders.

If these tips don’t help or you have concerns about wearing a mask, talk with your doctor about how to protect yourself and others during the pandemic.

What Your Test Results Mean

November 6, 2020

Whether you test positive or negative for COVID-19, you should take preventive measures to protect yourself and others.

A viral test checks samples to find out if you are currently infected with COVID-19. The time it takes to process these tests can vary. You can visit your state or local health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.

• If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first.
• If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and are not tested, it is important to stay home. Find out what to do if you are sick

Learn what actions to take when you receive either a negative or a positive COVID-19 test result.

Picking-Up Takeout Food: COVID-19

October 30, 2020

Picking up takeout food while slowing the spread of COVID-19?

  • Order & pay online or over the phone when possible.
  • Accept take-out without in-person contact or stay at least 6 feet away from others.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol after bringing home your food.

Learn more about taking essential trips at this time: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/essential-goods-services.html

What to Bring When Going Out

October 23, 2020

Going out? Keep these items on hand when in public spaces: a mask, disinfecting wipes, and a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, if possible.

Learn more about everyday ways to slow the spread of #COVID19: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/going-out.html

What to Do If You Are Sick

October 17, 2020

Do you think you may have COVID-19? If you think you’re sick, follow guidance about when to call your doctor:


• Monitor your symptoms
• Call ahead before visiting your doctor
• Avoid close contact with others when you’re out


Most people who get COVID-19 can take care of themselves at home. If you need to see a doctor, take precautions to protect yourself and others around you.

See more: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html

Coping with Stress

October 9, 2020

Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations like COVID-19. You may feel anxiousness, anger, sadness, or overwhelmed. Find ways to reduce your stress to help yourself and the people you care about.


• Learn the common signs of stress.
• Make time to unwind and do activities you enjoy.
• Talk with family and friends by phone, text, or email.

If you or a loved one is feeling overwhelmed, get support 24/7 by calling 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.

Learn more about stress and coping during the COVID-19 outbreak: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/managing-stress-anxiety.html

Information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Hand Hygiene Recommendations

October 4, 2020

Hand hygiene is an important part of the U.S. response to the international emergence of COVID-19. Practicing hand hygiene, which includes the use of alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) or handwashing, is a simple yet effective way to prevent the spread of pathogens and infections in healthcare settings. 

Hand Hygiene means cleaning your hands by using either handwashing (washing hands with soap and water), antiseptic hand wash, antiseptic hand rub (i.e. alcohol-based hand sanitizer including foam or gel), or surgical hand antisepsis

Cleaning your hands reduces:

  • The spread of potentially deadly germs to patients
  • The risk of healthcare provider colonization or infection caused by germs acquired from the patient

Methods for Hand Hygiene: Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer vs. Washing with Soap and Water

  • Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are the most effective products for reducing the number of germs on the hands of healthcare providers.
  • Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are the preferred method for cleaning your hands in most clinical situations.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water whenever they are visibly dirty, before eating, and after using the restroom.

Learn more at: https://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/providers/index.html

Content provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Deciding to Go Out

September 25, 2020

Wondering how you can do your daily activities safely while protecting yourself and your loved ones from COVID-19?

The more closely you interact with others and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread.

So, think about

  • How many people will be there?
  • Will the space be indoors or outdoors?
  • Will you spend a lot of time with others?

(“PST” here’s a hint – think People, Space, and Time.)

Learn more about assessing the risk when you‘re deciding to go out: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/deciding-to-go-out.html

Healthcare Personnel and First Responders: How to Cope with Stress and Build Resilience During the COVID-19 Pandemic

September 11, 2020

Providing care to others during the COVID-19 pandemic can lead to stress, anxiety, fear, and other strong emotions. How you cope with these emotions can affect your well-being, the care you give to others while doing your job, and the well-being of the people you care about outside of work.

During this pandemic, it is critical that you recognize what stress looks like, take steps to build your resilience and cope with stress, and know where to go if you need help.

Tips to cope and enhance your resilience:

  • Communicate with your coworkers, supervisors, and employees about job stress.
  • Remind yourself that everyone is in an unusual situation with limited resources.
  • Identify and accept those things which you do not have control over.
  • Recognize that you are performing a crucial role in fighting this pandemic and that you are doing the best you can with the resources available.
  • Increase your sense of control by keeping a consistent daily routine when possible — ideally one that is similar to your schedule before the pandemic.
  • When away from work, get exercise when you can. Spend time outdoors either being physically activity or relaxing. Do things you enjoy during non-work hours.
  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting and mentally exhausting, especially since you work with people directly affected by the virus.
  • If you feel you may be misusing alcohol or other drugs (including prescriptions), ask for help.
  • Engage in mindfulness techniques such as breathing exercises and meditation.
  • If you are being treated for a mental health condition, continue with your treatment and talk to your provider if you experience new or worsening symptoms.

 Learn more at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/mental-health-healthcare.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fcommunity%2Fmental-health-healthcare.html

What’s the Difference Between COVID-19 and Seasonal Allergies?

September 3, 2020

When choosing to go out in public or visit a loved one at higher risk, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends we pay close attention to our symptoms. For those of us with seasonal allergies, understanding symptoms  can present a challenge!  

Seasonal allergies triggered by airborne pollen can lead to seasonal allergic rhinitis, which affects the nose and sinuses, and seasonal allergic conjunctivitis, which affects the eyes. Your sniffles and sneezes may seem like symptoms of COVID-19.

While COVID-19 and seasonal allergies share many symptoms, there are some key differences between the two. 

For example, COVID-19 can cause fever, which is not a common symptom of seasonal allergies. The image below compares symptoms caused by allergies and COVID-19.

*Seasonal allergies do not usually cause shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, unless a person has a respiratory condition such as asthma that can be triggered by exposure to pollen.

This is not a complete list of all possible symptoms of COVID-19 or seasonal allergies. Symptoms vary from person to person and range from mild to severe. You can have symptoms of both COVID-19 and seasonal allergies at the same time.

If you think you have COVID-19, follow CDC’s guidance on ”What to do if you are sick.” If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), seek emergency medical care immediately.

How to Safely Wear and Take Off a Mask | Covid-19

August 28, 2020

Covid-19 has been found to spread mainly from person to person via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends wearing face masks to help slow the spread of COVID-19 when combined with every day preventive actions and social distancing in public settings.

Here are some guidelines on how to properly wear and take off a mask.

WEAR YOUR MASK CORRECTLY

  • Wash your hands before putting on your mask
  • Put it over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin
  • Try to fit it snugly against the sides of your face
  • Make sure you can breathe easily
  • Do not place a mask on a child younger than 2


USE A MASK TO HELP PROTECT OTHERS

  • Wear a mask to help protect others in case you’re infected but don’t have symptoms
  • Keep the mask on your face the entire time you’re in public
  • Don’t put the mask around your neck or up on your forehead
  • Don’t touch the mask, and, if you do, clean your hands


FOLLOW EVERYDAY HEALTH HABITS

  • Stay at least 6 feet away from others
  • Avoid contact with people who are sick
  • Wash your hands often, with soap and water, for at least
  • 20 seconds each time
  • Use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available


TAKE OFF YOUR MASK CAREFULLY WHEN YOU’RE HOME

  • Untie the strings behind your head or stretch the ear loops
  • Handle only by the ear loops or ties
  • Fold outside corners together
  • Place mask in the washing machine
  • Wash your hands with soap and water

For more info, see: cdc.gov/coronavirus

Protecting Your Friends | Covid-19

August 20, 2020
As students start returning to school, it’s important to remember to follow these steps to protect your friends & yourself.

RESIDENT SPOTLIGHT | Charlotte

August 17, 2020

Ms. Charlotte Page came to Boyd Nursing and Rehab Center with the diagnosis of L4 Compression fracture. This diagnosis made it impossible for her to walk without severe fear and pain.
With the help of both nursing and therapy Care Team Members, she has improved tremendously! Charlotte can now ambulate greater than 200ft with the use of a front wheel walker with standby assistance of staff and is transferring to the chair or wheelchair with only assistance of one. She is no longer afraid to participate in therapy and makes daily strides to regain her previous level of functioning. Charlotte is determined and dedicated to her recovery. We are so proud of her and celebrate her successes!

Traveling & Covid-19

August 14, 2020
If you are traveling, help stop the spread of COVID-19 and other respiratory illnesses by following these steps. 

RESIDENT SPOTLIGHT | Robin

August 10, 2020

Robin Caldwell arrived at Boyd Nursing and Rehab after a short stay in the hospital due to possible cerebrovascular accident.
Robin has received support from nursing & therapy Care Team Members, & has since begun walking in the hallways! She can now ambulate with the use of a roller walker & assistance of one Care Team Member for supervision only!
Robin enjoys attending activities & fine dining in the main dining room. After returning home, Robin plans to spend time volunteering at Boyd Nursing and Rehab.
We are very proud of the success Robin has made & look forward to the day she is able to return to volunteer!

Youth Sports & Covid-19

August 7, 2020
As we try moving toward a new normal, Summer sports are starting back up. Here are some tips and recommendations to keep you and your players safe during the Covid-19 Pandemic.

Food & Covid-19

July 24, 2020

Currently, there is no evidence to suggest that handling food or consuming food is associated with COVID-19.

Coronaviruses, like the one that causes COVID-19, are thought to spread mostly person-to-person through respiratory droplets when someone coughs, sneezes, or talks. It is possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object, including food or food packaging, that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. However, this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

After shopping, handling food packages, or before preparing or eating food, it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry. Remember, it is always important to follow good food safety practices to reduce the risk of illness from common foodborne pathogens.


Content Source: The Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Testing for Covid-19

July 17, 2020

Viral tests check samples from your respiratory system, such as a swab from the inside of your nose, to tell you if you currently have an infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Some tests are point-of-care tests, meaning results may be available at the testing site in less than an hour. Other tests must be sent to a laboratory to analyze, a process that takes 1–2 days once received by the lab.


How to get a Viral Test

Here is some information that may help you make decisions about getting a viral test:

• Most people have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. Contact your healthcare provider if your symptoms are getting worse or if you have questions about your health.
• Decisions about testing are made by state and local health departments or healthcare providers.
• If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and are not tested, it is important to stay home.


What to do After a Viral Test
• If you test positive for COVID-19, know what protective steps to take if you are sick or caring for someone.
• If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. However, that does not mean you will not get sick. The test result only means that you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing. You may test negative if the sample was collected early in your infection and test positive later during your illness. You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and get infected then. This means you could still spread the virus. If you develop symptoms later, you may need another test to determine if you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.

COVID-19 testing differs by location. If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first. You can also visit your state or local health department’s website to look for the latest local information on testing.

Visiting Friends and Family with Higher Risk for Severe Illness

July 10, 2020
When you visit friends & family who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19, take these important steps. Wear cloth face coverings, stay at least 6 feet apart, meet outside if possible, wash your hands often, & sanitize all touched surfaces.

Cleaning and Disinfectin

June 26, 2020

When cleaning and disinfecting a public space, workplace, business, school or even your home, you have to put together a plan. Cleaning with soap and water removes germs, dirt, and impurities from surfaces while disinfecting actually kills the germs on surfaces. Cleaning lowers the risk of spreading infection, but disinfecting can even further lower that risk. Once you have a plan in place, you must implement then maintain and revise.

Develop Your Plan

  • Determine what needs to be cleaned
  • Determine how areas will be disinfected
  • Consider the resources and equipment needed

Consider the type of surface and how often the surface is touched. Prioritize disinfecting frequently touched surfaces and be mindful of the availability of products needed and PPE.

Implement the Plan

  • Clean visibly dirty surfaces with soap and water prior to disinfection
  • Use the appropriate cleaning or disinfecting product
  • Always follow the directions on the label

Maintain and Revise the Plan

  • Continue routine cleaning and disinfection
  • Maintain safe practices
  • Continue practices that reduce the potential for exposure

Continue to revise and improve upon your plan based on the appropriate disinfectant and PPE availability. Frequently wash your hands, use cloth face coverings and stay home while you are sick.


Content Source: The Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Fabric Face Coverings

June 12, 2020

Covid-19 has been found to spread mainly from person to person via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks. Studies show that these droplets can usually travel around 6 feet and can land in the mouths or noses of people who are within that distance and possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Wearing a cloth face covering may not protect the wearer directly, but it may keep the wearer from spreading the virus to others. The Center for Disease Control recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.

Examples of those settings include:
• Grocery stores
• Pharmacies
• Gas stations
• Post Office
• Bank


Cloth face coverings are encouraged because they will slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus (and don’t know it yet) from transmitting it to others.

How to wear your face covering correctly:
• Wash your hands before putting on your cloth face covering
• Wear it over your nose and mouth and secure it under your chin
• Try to fit the cover snuggly against the sides of your face
• Make sure you can breathe easily


Wearing face coverings is a way to protect those around you. It is encouraged to be worn so you do not transmit the virus to others if you have it and are not presenting symptoms yet; though there are things to keep in mind for your own safety in removing the covering properly.

Examples include:
• Don’t put the covering around your neck or up on your forehead
• Do not touch the face covering, and if you do, wash or sanitize your hands afterwards
• Keep the covering on your face the entire time you’re in public
• Handle only by the ear loops
• Fold outside corners in together
• After removing, do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth, and wash your hands immediately after removing



Our care team members are required to wear medical grade masks at all times while in our communities. Cloth face coverings are encouraged outside of medical facilities and should only be worn in situations like the ones listed above.

Stress During Covid-19

May 30, 2020

Per the Center for Disease Control, the outbreak of Covid-19 may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in those affected.


Stress during an infectious disease outbreak can include:
• Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones.
• Changes in sleep or eating patterns.
• Difficulty sleeping or concentrating


Here are some ways you can help cope with this stress:
• Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.
• Take care of your body
• Take deep breaths
• Stretch
• Eat healthy, well-balanced meals
• Exercise regularly
• Get plenty of sleep
• Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
• Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.

Proper Handwashing Technique

May 22, 2020

Per the Center for Disease Control (CDC),Hand hygiene is an important part of the U.S. response to the international emergence of COVID-19. Practicing hand hygiene, which includes the use of alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) or handwashing, is a simple yet effective way to prevent the spread of pathogens and infections in healthcare settings. CDC recommendations reflect this important role. Please refer to the handwashing diagram (below) provided by the World Health Organization to learn how to properly and most effectively wash your hands.